Source of Informations

Vitamin A is required for the proper development and functioning of our eyes, skin, immune system, and many other parts of our bodies

Share
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Vitamin A is a vitamin. It can be found in many fruits, vegetables, eggs, whole milk, butter, fortified margarine, meat, and oily saltwater fish. It can also be made in a laboratory.
VITAMIN AF


Vitamin A is used for treating vitamin A deficiency. It is also used to reduce complications of diseases such as malaria, HIV, measles, and diarrhea in children with vitamin A deficiency.

Women use vitamin A for heavy menstrual periods, premenstrual syndrome (PMS), vaginal infections, yeast infections, “lumpy breasts” (fibrocystic breast disease), and to prevent breast cancer. Some women with HIV use vitamin A to decrease the risk of transmitting HIV to the baby during pregnancy, childbirth, or breast-feeding.

Men use vitamin A to raise their sperm count.

Some people use vitamin A for improving vision and treating eye disorders including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), glaucoma, and cataracts.

Vitamin A is also used for skin conditions including acne, eczema, psoriasis, cold sores, wounds, burns, sunburn, keratosis follicularis (Darier’s disease), ichthyosis (noninflammatory skin scaling), lichen planus pigmentosus, and pityriasis rubra pilaris.

It is also used for gastrointestinal ulcers, Crohn’s disease, gum disease, diabetes, Hurler syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis), sinus infections, hayfever, and urinary tract infections (UTIs).

Vitamin A is also used for shigellosis, diseases of the nervous system, nose infections, loss of sense of smell, asthma, persistent headaches, kidney stones, overactive thyroid, iron-poor blood (anemia), deafness, ringing in the ears, and precancerous mouth sores (leukoplakia).

Other uses include preventing and treating cancer, protecting the heart and cardiovascular system, slowing the aging process, and boosting the immune system.

Vitamin A is applied to the skin to improve wound healing, reduce wrinkles, and to protect the skin against UV radiation.

How does it work?
Vitamin A is required for the proper development and functioning of our eyes, skin, immune system, and many other parts of our bodies.:SOURCE -://www.webmd.com/


Risks of Not Getting Enough Vitamin A
Worldwide, up to half a million malnourished children go blind each year because of vitamin A deficiency. In the U.S., deficiency is more likely to be found in those eating a severely restricted and unhealthy diet or among alcoholics. Alcohol accelerates the breakdown of retinol through enzymatic activity and interferes with the conversion of carotenoids to retinol (Note: Heavy alcohol drinkers – 2+ drinks daily – are advised to take a multiple vitamin containing preformed vitamin A as retinyl acetate or retinyl palmitate).

Risks of Consuming Too Much Vitamin A
The primary risks of too much vitamin A (either acute or chronic excess) are birth defects, liver abnormalities, central nervous system disorders, and lower bone mineral density that might increase osteoporosis risk. Since the American diet contains many fortified foods, the relationship between vitamin A and decreased bone density has become a greater concern.

Both human and animal studies show that a higher vitamin A intake interferes with bone metabolism. Specifically, excess vitamin A suppresses osteoblast (bone-building) activity, stimulates osteoclast (bone breakdown) formation, and interferes with vitamin D’s role in calcium absorption and regulation.

In one study, women consuming more than 6,660 IU daily of vitamin A as retinol in food or supplements (the daily recommendation for adult women is 2,310 IU) were found to have twice the hip fracture risk compared to those consuming 1,700 IU daily or less. Men with the highest blood levels of retinol are seven times more likely to fracture a hip than men with lower levels (study details). There is evidence that older individuals have higher blood levels of vitamin A because of a reduced ability to metabolize vitamin A as efficiently as one ages.

The chart below shows the most concentrated vitamin A sources, both animal and plant. As you can see, fortification (see blue section) makes it easy to surpass the 6,660 IU level, especially if you regularly consume liver, cod liver oil, margarine, butter, and cheese.

Note: All vitamin A toxicity issues pertain to retinol intake (in foods and supplements containing retinol, retinyl palmitate, or retinyl acetate) and NOT supplemental or food-based carotenoid intake (like beta-carotene).

 Animal Sources of Vitamin A

 Serving

Vitamin A
(IU)

%RDA
Women

%RDA
Men

Polar bear liver

1 oz

100,000 IU

4,330%

3,330%

Turkey giblets

½ cup

25,950

1120%

865%

Beef liver

3 oz

22,175

960%

740%

Cod liver oil

1 tsp

4,500

200%

150%

Chicken liver

3 oz

4,255

185%

140%

Braunschweiger (liver sausage)

2 slices

7,975

345%

265%

Beef stew, canned

1 cup

3,860

165%

130%

Malted drink mix, w/ whole milk

1 cup

3,032

130%

100%

Centrum Multi, Original & Silver

1 tablet

2,485

110%

80%

Slim Fast

1 can

809

35%

25%

Kellogg’s Product 19

1 cup

750

30%

25%

Kellogg’s Nutri-Grain Cereal Bar

1 bar

750

30%

25%

Fortified breakfast cereals

1 cup

500–750

20–30%

15-25%

Ensure

1 can

578

25%

20%

Kellogg’s Raisin Bran

1 cup

517

20%

15%

Skim milk, added vitamin A

1 cup

500

20%

15%

Margarine, added vitamin A

1 tbsp

500

20%

15%

Butter

1 tbsp

355

15%

10%

Egg

1 large

335

15%

10%

Salmon

3.5 oz

324

15%

10%

Cheddar cheese

1 oz

284

12%

9%

Whole milk

1 cup

250

10%

8%

 

 

 

 

 

Plant Sources of Vitamin A
(as carotenoids)

 Serving

Vitamin A
(IU)

%RDA
Women

%RDA
Men

Sweet potato

1 med.

28,058

1215%

935%

Pumpkin, canned

½ cup

19,065

825%

635%

Carrots, cooked

½ cup

13,418

580%

445%

Spinach, cooked

½ cup

11,458

495%

380%

Collards, cooked

½ cup

9,769

420%

325%

Kale, cooked

½ cup

9,558

415%

320%

Turnip greens, cooked

½ cup

8,828

380%

290%

Winter squash

½ cup

5,353

230%

175%

Red peppers, cooked

½ cup

3,738

160%

125%

Cantaloupe

1 cup

5,411

235%

180%

Lettuce, Green Leaf

1 cup

4,147

180%

135%

Green peas, cooked

1 cup

3,360

145%

110%

Apricots, dried

3

2,022

88%

65%

Butternut squash, cooked

1⁄2 cup

1,900 IU

80%

60%

Broccoli, cooked

½ cup

1,208

52%

40%

SOURCE://bestnaturalfoods.com/

Comments

comments