Source of Informations

Protect Yourself and Your Family – 2020

Share
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
Protect Yourself and Your Family

Protect Yourself and Your Family from Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Infectious disease experts say most cases of COVID-19 are mild to moderate, like the common cold. But it can be more severe in older adults and people with chronic health conditions.

Most of the early reported cases had contact with a seafood and live animal market, suggesting an animal source of the outbreak. However, most cases are now likely to be spread from person to person by droplets when coughing. Since this virus is very new, health authorities continue to carefully watch how this virus spreads.

There are simple steps you can take to help protect yourself and your family.

Symptoms

Monitor Your Symptoms. Common symptoms are fever and cough.

Emergency Warning Signs Include:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Pain or pressure in the chest that doesn’t go away
  • Experience confusion or trouble waking up
  • Bluish lips or face

Call for medical attention immediately.

*This list is not all inclusive. Please consult your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning.

Childhood Inflammatory Disease Related to COVID-19

The State Department of Health is investigating several cases of severe illness in children and child deaths that may be related to COVID-19. Children are experiencing symptoms similar to Kawasaki disease and toxic shock-like syndrome possibly due to COVID-19.

At the Governor’s direction, The State Department of Health has issued an advisory about this serious inflammatory diseaseto inform healthcare providers of the condition, as well as to provide guidance for testing and reporting. Health care providers, including hospitals, are required to report to the Department of Health all cases of pediatric multisystem inflammatory syndrome potentially associated with COVID-19 in those under 21 years of age.

New Yorkers should seek immediate care if a child has:

  •   Prolonged fever (more than five days)
  •   Difficulty feeding (infants) or is too sick to drink fluids
  •   Severe abdominal pain, diarrhea or vomiting
  •   Change in skin color – becoming pale, patchy and/or blue
  •   Trouble breathing or is breathing very quickly
  •   Racing heart or chest pain
  •   Decreased amount of frequency in urine
  •   Lethargy, irritability or confusion

Find additional information and updates.

Prevention

Everyone sh ould:

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially before you eat.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people; do not shake hands.
  • Keep a distance of at least 6 feet from others.
  • Wear a face mask or cloth face covering that covers your nose and mouth when in public and/or when 6 feet of social distancing cannot be maintained.
  • Cover your cough and sneezes with a tissue and discard it in a closed container.
  • Clean frequently touched surfaces and objects.

For people who are sick:

  • Stay home.
  • If you have a fever, stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone without the use of fever-reducing medicines, such as acetaminophen.
  • Keep sick household members away from others. If you have a separate room that is best.
  • Use soap and water, a bleach and water solution, or EPA-approved household products. You can make your own cleanser with a mixture of 1 cup of liquid unscented chlorine bleach in 5 gallons of water.
  • Avoid sharing personal items.
  • Anyone at high risk for complications should talk to their healthcare provider for more information.

NEXT SECTION

ContinueMasks & Face Coverings Guidance

Masks & Face Coverings Guidance

Cloth face coverings can be fashioned from household items or made at home from common materials at low-cost, and should be used as a public health measure, beyond social distancing.

Individuals must procure, fashion, or otherwise obtain face coverings and wear them when they are in a public and are: 

  • within six feet of distance from other individuals; or 
  • in a situation or setting where they are unable to maintain six feet of distance from other individuals; or 
  • in a public or private transportation carrier or for-hire vehicle. 

When wearing cloth face coverings in public settings, where social distancing measures are difficult to maintain (e.g., grocery stores and pharmacies), especiallyin areas of significant community transmission, you should: 

  • Make sure that they fit snugly and cover their nose and mouth. 
  • Be changed frequently and laundered when they are soiled or wet. 
  • Not become complacent with other protective measures.
    • Do not touch the cloth covering or face.
    • Continue to be vigilant with thorough and frequent hand washing with soap and water, or alcohol-based hand sanitizer of 60%+ alcohol. 
    • Practice respiratory etiquette and cover your coughs or sneezes. 
    • Practice social distancing – even when wearing masks. 
    • Stay home and help flatten the curve! 

While cloth face coverings may not prevent the wearer from becoming infected, they might help slow spread from people who have the virus and are unaware. 

Read the guidance document on use of cloth face coverings by the NYS Department of Health. 

Face Coverings in the Workplace

Executive Order 202.16 directs employers to provide essential workers with masks free of charge to wear when interacting with the public.

Businesses Can Deny Entry

Executive Order 202.34 authorizes businesses to deny entry to individuals who do not wear masks or face-coverings. 

//65tes-habeshamusic

Comments

comments