Source of Informations

Brazilian twins born conjoined at the HEAD but who had their own brains are separated in a 15-hour operation

Brazilian twins born conjoined at the HEAD but who had their own brains are separated in a 15-hour operation


Source Daily Mail Online

Brazilian twins born conjoined at the HEAD but who had their own brains are separated in a 15-hour operation

Ysabelle and Ysadora Freitas were one-of-a-kind in Brazil. International surgeons came together to operate four times on the twins.

The mother, Débora, struggled to raise them with little help for 18 months, hoping that one day the girls would be able to lead normal lives.

Medics across the globe came together to operate in pioneering surgery on four separate occasions, the last in November 2018.

However, the scan showed something was abnormal with their babies.

Each baby weighed more than 7.7lbs (3.5kg) and were perfectly healthy, despite sharing a head.

The family were then introduced to a neurosurgeon, Professor Hélio Machado, who temporarily moved them to his hospital Ribeirão Preto’s Medical School in São Paulo.

Before the last surgery, the girls had skin expanders placed under the scalps to create extra skin, which would be used to cover both their heads (before the surgery)

Professor Machado said: ‘The rarity of this condition makes the medical procedures extremely complex. So we organised a group of people to help us with the treatment of these children.’

The first operation, when the twins were 18 months old, was led by Brazilian neurosurgeon Dr Ricardo Oliveira, and cut off and re-routed sections of the twins’ shared blood supply.

In preparation for the fourth surgery, skin expanders were placed under the girls’ scalps to create extra skin, which would be used to cover both their heads once they were separated.

‘It’s going to be such a wonderful thing that I can’t even explain what I’m feeling.’

HOW RARE ARE CRANIOPAGUS CONJOINED TWINS?Craniopagus conjoined twins are babies who are connected at the top of the cranium.

Overall, conjoined twins are more likely to be female.

About 40 percent are stillborn and an additional 33 percent die after birth, normally due to organ failure or abnormalities.

And after an excruciating eight hours and 40 minutes, Ysabelle and Ysadora were separated.

‘When we saw that they were separated it was like magic. Suddenly we have two separated children’

Mr Freitas added: ‘It’s a lovely moment holding the girls in our arms.’

Dr Begamo said: ‘I believe that they’ll need physical motor and neurological rehabilitation for quite some time, maybe until they’re five years old.

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